Report: Education not preventing minority poverty

Fix energy prices until 30th September 2017

Looking to switch your business energy supplier? Click here

Use our OFGEM accredited comparison tool to compare the whole market today.

Education is not helping solve the problem of poverty among Britain's ethnic minorities, a report suggests.

Today's research from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation (JRF) thinktank claims that while 20 per cent of the UK's white population live in poverty, the equivalent figure for ethnic minorities is double that at 40 per cent.

Bangladeshi and Pakistani minorities are especially unlikely to be able to find work but, even with a university degree, they are less likely to be employed than someone who is white with the same qualifications.

Furthermore Pakistani and Bangladeshi women – whose numbers at university have recently increased – are "much less likely" to be in work than their British or Indian counterparts.

The report, which also concludes that ethnic minorities are being paid less and are frequently "overlooked" for jobs, prefers to blame a wide range of factors rather than suggesting that employers are actively engaged in racial discrimination.

It does, however, argue that ultimately education is failing "to close the gap".

"Although the past decade has seen some improvements, there are still some very serious problems which remain unsolved," JRF director Julia Unwin said.

"We need an urgent rethink from government and employers so that minority ethnic groups do not miss out on opportunities in the workplace and higher educational attainment is properly recognised."

Click here to run an energy price comparison, and see if you could be paying less for your gas and electricity.



Found this page interesting?

Help spread the word and share this page with your friends and family on your social networks.