DECC report: UK well on the way to hitting 2020 green energy targets

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A new Government report has suggested that Britain is well on the way to hitting its 2020 green energy targets.

The Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Renewable Energy Roadmap report said low-carbon electricity generation had increased by more than a quarter over the past year up to June 2012.

The report claimed that in total, renewable energy accounted for over ten per cent of the total supply of electricity in that period.

This was a growth of 27% according to the updated Renewable Energy Roadmap status report.

In total the UK has a target to produce 15% of the country's energy from renewables by 2020.

Head of the DECC and Government energy secretary, Ed Davey, said renewable energy was increasingly powering the UK's grid, as well as the economy and that it was a fantastic achievement to see ten per cent of power now generated from renewables.

He said: "Right now, getting new infrastructure investment into the economy is crucial to driving growth and supporting jobs across the country ... I am determined that we get ahead in the global race on renewables and build on the big-money investments we've seen this year."

The DECC expects UK energy firms including the Big Six - all part of the Warm Home Discount Scheme - to invest progressively more and more into renewable energies.

In particular wind energy is expected to play a significant part of this; with offshore wind power capacity growing around 60% to 2.5 giagwatts (GW) and onshore wind growing around 24% 50 5.3GW this year alone according to the Renewable Energy Roadmap report.

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